Archives

Sauerkraut with Apples and Raisins

Sauerkraut

It’s sauerkraut season!  Fall is the traditional time to ferment cabbage.  When the heat of the summer is over, it’s time to start preserving for the winter months.  I actually cheated a little and started this ferment in the early summer with the first harvest of cabbage.  Modern wonders like air conditioning and refrigeration let us play with timing though.  My lovely sauerkraut is now about 4 months and tastes amazing!  While the apples and raisins do start off sweet, by the time the sauerkraut is done fermenting, they are no longer sweet at all.

Sauerkraut with Apples and Raisins

  • 3 lbs cabbage, cored and shredded
  • 2 tart apples (granny smith), peeled, cored and chopped
  • 1 onion, sliced thin
  • 1/8 cup raisins
  • 1 tbsp caraway seeds
  • Sea salt (see below)
Combine all ingredients except salt.  Weigh everything together. Mine was about 4lbs.
Add salt according to weight:
4.4 gms of salt per pound of veggies. Rounded to the nearest gram.
3lbs = 13 gms of salt
4lbs = 18 gms ofsalt
5lbs = 22 gms of salt
Mix salt into cabbage mixture.  Let set for about 30 mins to release the juices.

Pound into your fermenting vessel (Pickl-it and Harsch are my recommendations) by placing a large scoop or two of cabbage in your jar.  Press down with either a rolling pin, a wooden spoon or a kraut pounder. Press the cabbage firmly so that you have a good 1-2″ of brine over the top of the cabbage.  If your cabbage is dry and you don’t have that much brine, add a little 2% brine over the top (19 gms of salt per 1 quart of water).

To keep the cabbage under the brine, you can either use carrot peelings arranged in a spoke formation or a cabbage leaf with a Dunk’R on top.  Here are some more suggestion: Holding Down Floaters.

Seal your jar and let set at room temp for 3-10 days according to the temp in your house.  Pickl-It recommends fermenting at 68-72F for 10 days and reducing the time by 2 days for each degree over 72F.  For instance, 7 days for 73F, 5 days for 74F and no more than 3 days for any temp of 75F.  Cabbage is not traditionally made in the heat of the summer but rather is made once the temps start cooling down.

After the 3-10 days at room temp, place kraut in a cool location.  Ideally a basement or root cellar that is around 45-55F.  If you don’t have a cool place like that, you can store the kraut in the warmest part of your refrigerator which is usually either in the door or the top shelf toward the front (bottom shelf in the back is the coldest part).

In this cool location, let the kraut ferment for a minimum of 10-12 weeks.  Many people don’t touch the kraut until 6 months have past. You can taste the kraut at this point.  It should not taste like cabbage or be salty.

Come back tomorrow for some sauerkraut troubleshooting.  Do you have any sauerkraut questions?  Let me know in the comments and I’ll try to answer them in tomorrow’s post.


**This post may contain affiliate links. Purchasing from these links helps support Pickle Me Too, allowing me to post and store all of my free recipes. Thank you!**

38 comments to Sauerkraut with Apples and Raisins

  • Sharmista

    What size pick-l it would you use for this recipe?

  • […] http://www.picklemetoo.com/2012/11/15/sauerkraut-with-apples-and-raisins/   <<<< recipe credits  Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:LikeBe the first to like this. […]

  • Martha Paley Francescato

    Since I am sick and don’t have time or energy to make it, is there any brand I can buy that is decent? Thanks!

  • […] various toppings.  Place back in oven and bake until cheese is melted and bubbly.  I love to add sauerkraut after it’s […]

  • Jan

    I love sauerkraut..Where can I get the equiptment???

  • Barb

    Any thoughts…. My husband made some sauerkraut 7 weeks ago in his Harsch Crock. The water kept disappearing from the moat so we added more every couple days. Now that it is open, seems the water had been sucked back into the crock. Kraut is very watery. Don’t know if it’s still good or perhaps too diluted and not safe to eat. Any ideas or can you direct us to a place that might know.
    Many thanks.

    • Hmm, I’m not sure. I’ll ask around and see if anyone else has had that happen. There should be at least an inch of brine on top of the sauerkraut. Is there more water than that?

      • Barb

        Yes,alot more water. When he closed it up the brine was just above the stones. Now the water is all the way up to the top of the crock.

        He has made kraut before and this hasn’t happened. We don’t know if it is safe to eat or if we should discard it and try again. We haven’t been able to find any info about this.

        Thanks for your help.

    • Chris

      The question from Barb on March 16, 2013 at 3:06 pm concerning she and her husband and his Harsch Crock. The water kept disappearing from the moat so they added more every couple days and the water had been sucked back into the crock. Kraut is very watery. Didn’t know if it’s still good or perhaps too diluted and not safe to eat. Well I have the same problem with my Harsch crock. I keep adding salt water. The water level goes up and down and sometimes overflows but the kraut comes out just fine. I just make sure the salt to water is the same as when I first made the brine.

  • Marci

    3lbs = 13 gms of salt
    4lbs = 18 gms ofsalt
    5lbs = 22 gms of salt

    Wow, this seems like WAY TOO MUCH salt!!! Did you mean tablespoons instead of pounds?

    Also in your last paragraph “until 6 months have past.” should be “until 6 months have passed.”

    Habits working as a proofreader. 🙂

  • Marci

    Ok, I just re-read this and figured out you meant the pounds of VEGGIES to salt. PHEW! 🙂

  • […] Recipe –> http://www.picklemetoo.com/2012/11/15/sauerkraut-with-apples-and-raisins/ […]

  • Holly

    This sounded so wonderful I just had to make it. I’ll let you know how it turned out four weeks from now. How can I wait that long?

  • Holly

    Oh man I just re-read your last comments about waiting 10-12 weeks. I thought 4 weeks was going to be a killer amount of time to wait. Heavy sigh……I’ll try to wait that long. No promises though.

  • G

    I don’t like the flavor of caraway seeds. Is flavoring their purpose here?

  • Susan

    I love your recipes, but I’m wondering why you use Lbs. for the cabbage and grams for the salt. I always have to find a conversion chart for the salt.

  • Loving the sound of this one, when in the fridge is it ok to seal the lid or does it have to have the airlock for the whole 6 months?

  • Colleen

    I made a kraut in a Harsch crock one week ago, so it’s now ready to go into cold storage. Problem is, there is no cold storage where I live. There’s the fridge, but my crock will not fit in there.

    Is it OK to transfer the kraut from the Harsch crock (now, after having fermented at a warm room temp for a week) into 4 mason jars and store in the fridge?

    I appreciate your help, as I don’t want to mess this up!!

    Thank you!

  • Mary

    I usually make 30-40 lbs of kraut each fall, and can it using the water bath method. Have you canned this particular recipe? It sounds wonderful, and really want to try it. Thank you for your help.

    • I have not canned this recipe yet. I try to keep my kraut fresh because it’s rich in wonderful lactic acid bacteria that are killed during canning, but this year I have so much kraut, I don’t have room for all of it. It should work just fine to can. I’ll let you know when I try it.

  • Lisa

    With regard to fermenting time. I want to make sure I have this correct. Cabbage ferments need first about 10 days on the counter, then 3months in ‘cold storage’ which is about 55degrees or so? Is that right?

    What if I did 10 days in my house then a month or so at about 62degrees? If it tastes great by then have i gone thru the full ferment? Are the histamines still a problem at this stage? I guess I’m wondering if the 62 degrees, being that it’s warmer than ‘cold storage’, speeds up the ferment and is it an OK temp to keep it out at?

    If it has sped up, so to speak, are the histamines now not a problem, or would they still be? It seems putting the ferment on the door of my fridge would actually take longer than 3months given it’s SO cold in there! And if 62 degrees is still fairly cool, maybe the ferment is not going too fast and it’s OK?

    Is it tasting fresh, zingy, crunchy, (not salty) and just plain GOOD 😉 a sign the ferment is done?

    Thanks for any help here!

    Lisa

  • Lisa

    OH, I had another question. With NON-cabbage ferments, i.e. carrots or something, do we not have the histamine issue?

    Do they need only 5-7 days on the counter then put in the fridge and start eating? Or do they need longer ‘cold storage’ too? If so, do they need the 3 months?

    If they are ‘done’ after the initial 5-7 days, why do these other veggies not need as long at cabbage?

    Do non-cabbage ferments produce as much LAB’s as cabbage ferments?

    Thanks again for any insights!!

    Lisa

  • […] No compilation of cabbage uses would be complete without Sauerkraut. Here are three different recipes that include some zip and heat. It took me a little while to develop a taste for sauerkraut and I developed it by starting with a sweeter version that included apples and raisins. […]

  • […] No compilation of cabbage uses would be complete without Sauerkraut. Here are three different recipes that include some zip and heat. It took me a little while to develop a taste for sauerkraut and I developed it by starting with a sweeter version that included apples and raisins. […]

  • […] No compilation of cabbage uses would be complete without Sauerkraut. Here are three different recipes that include some zip and heat. It took me a little while to develop a taste for sauerkraut and I developed it by starting with a sweeter version that included apples and raisins. […]

  • […] No compilation of cabbage uses would be complete without Sauerkraut. Here are three different recipesthat include some zip and heat. It took me a little while to develop a taste for sauerkraut and I developed it by starting with a sweeter version that included apples and raisins. […]

  • Jen

    I started this two days ago, it’s my third batch of sauerkraut, my first with raisins and apples, the last two were just cabbage. The kraut smells fine, but the bribe about the cabbage has gone an orangey colour. Is this ok? Wondered if it’s from the raisins near the top? The cabbage is all white still. I’ve read you should throw pink kraut out.

  • wendy

    i put mason jars with the lids and bands on a plate over the liquid in kraut , they rusted and turned it kinda brown is it still good ? i think the rust killed it because it quit fermenting .

  • Elyse

    Question (as I am new to fermenting):
    Does it have to be carraway seeds as I am having trouble finding any.
    My recipe is called Christmas Kraut – would it work with other flavorings/seeds?

Leave a Reply

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>